The Very First Public Water Features of the Historical Past

As originally developed, fountains were designed to be functional, guiding water from creeks or aqueducts to the residents of cities and villages, where the water could be used for cooking food, washing, and drinking. To make water flow through a fountain until the later part of the 1800’s, and generate a jet of water, demanded gravity and a water source such as a spring or lake, positioned higher than the fountain. Fountains throughout history have been crafted as memorials, impressing local citizens and tourists alike. If you saw the first fountains, you would not recognize them as fountains. Designed for drinking water and ceremonial purposes, the first fountains were basic carved stone basins. c_077__27676.jpg Rock basins are theorized to have been 1st utilized around 2000 BC. Early fountains put to use in ancient civilizations depended on gravity to control the movement of water through the fountain. These historic water fountains were built to be functional, often situated along reservoirs, streams and waterways to provide drinking water. The Romans began building decorative fountains in 6 BC, most of which were bronze or natural stone masks of wildlife and mythological characters. The impressive aqueducts of Rome supplied water to the eye-catching public fountains, many of which you can travel to today.

Agrippa’s Splendid Water-lifting Appliance

In 1588, Agrippa’s water-lifting discovery captivated the attention and compliments of Andrea Bacci but that turned out to be one of the very last references of the mechanism. It could perhaps be that in 1592 when Rome’s latest waterway, the Acqua Felice, set about delivering the Villa Medici, there was simply no longer much use for the unit. In truth it was perhaps merely forgotten when Ferdinando returned to Florence in 1588 following the death of his sibling, Francesco di Medici, leading Ferdinando to give up his position as a cardinal in order to protect his place as the next Grand Duke of Tuscany. Renaissance gardens of the later part of the sixteenth century were home to works like musical water features, scenographic water presentations and water caprices (giochi d’acqua), but these were not brimming with water in ways which went against gravitation itself.

Greece: Cultural Sculpture

Sculptors garnished the lavish columns and archways with renderings of the gods until the period came to a close and more Greeks had begun to think of their theology as superstitious rather than sacred; at that instant, it became more standard for sculptors be paid to show ordinary individuals as well. Affluent families would often times commission a rendering of their ancestors for their big family tombs; portraiture additionally became prevalent and would be appropriated by the Romans upon their acquisition of Greek civilization. A time of aesthetic enhancement, the use of sculpture and other art forms morphed through the Greek Classical period, so it is inexact to suggest that the arts served only one function. It could be the advanced quality of Greek sculpture that grabs our eye these days; it was on a leading-edge practice of the ancient world whether it was made for religious reasons or aesthetic pleasure.

The City Of Rome, Gian Bernini, And Water Features

There are many famous fountains in Rome’s city center. One of the greatest sculptors and artists of the 17th century, Gian Lorenzo Bernini planned, conceptualized and constructed almost all of them. Also a city designer, he had skills as a fountain designer, and marks of his life's work are apparent throughout the avenues of Rome. Bernini's father, a renowned Florentine sculptor, mentored his young son, and they ultimately moved to Rome, in order to fully express their art, primarily in the form of public water fountains and water features. An excellent employee, the young Bernini earned praise and patronage of many popes and influential designers. He was originally celebrated for his sculpture.

An expert in ancient Greek architecture, he used this knowledge as a base and melded it gracefully with Roman marble, most notably in the Vatican. Though he was influenced by many, Michelangelo had the most profound impact on him, both personally and professionally.

Outdoor Garden Fountain Designers Through History

Often serving as architects, sculptors, artists, engineers and cultivated scholars all in one, from the 16th to the later part of the 18th century, fountain designers were multi-talented individuals, Leonardo da Vinci, a Renaissance artist, was renowned as an inspired intellect, inventor and scientific virtuoso. The forces of nature inspired him to research the properties and movement of water, and due to his curiosity, he carefully captured his findings in his now celebrated notebooks. Coupling imagination with hydraulic and landscaping talent, early Italian water fountain engineers modified private villa settings into amazing water exhibits filled of emblematic implications and natural wonder. The humanist Pirro Ligorio, distinguished for his virtuosity in archeology, architecture and garden design, offered the vision behind the splendors in Tivoli. For the many estates in the vicinity of Florence, other water feature engineers were well versed in humanistic subjects and ancient scientific texts, masterminding the incredible water marbles, water highlights and water antics.


Your Outdoor Living Area: A Great Spot for a Garden Fountain
The space required for a cascading or spouting fountain is substantial, so a wall fountain is the ideal size for a small yard. There are two types of fountains to choose... read more