The Original Water Fountain Designers

aq_78208_2__45627.jpg Often working as architects, sculptors, artists, engineers and cultivated scholars all in one, from the 16th to the late 18th century, fountain designers were multi-faceted people, Exemplifying the Renaissance artist as a innovative legend, Leonardo da Vinci toiled as an innovator and scientific guru. The forces of nature led him to explore the properties and movement of water, and due to his fascination, he carefully documented his observations in his now celebrated notebooks. Combining imaginativeness with hydraulic and landscaping mastery, early Italian fountain engineers changed private villa settings into brilliant water exhibits loaded of symbolic meaning and natural wonder. The humanist Pirro Ligorio brought the vision behind the wonders in Tivoli and was celebrated for his skill in archeology, architecture and garden design. Masterminding the extraordinary water marbles, water attributes and water pranks for the assorted mansions in the vicinity of Florence, other fountain designers were well versed in humanistic issues as well as time-honored technical texts.

The Positive Benefits of installing a Fountain in Your Living Space

The inclusion of a wall fountain or an outdoor garden fountain is an excellent way to embellish your yard or garden design. Many contemporary designers and craftsmen have been inspired by historical fountains and water features. Therefore, in order to connect your home to previous times, include one these in your decor. Among the many properties of these beautiful garden fountains is the water and moisture they discharge into the air which attracts birds and other wild life as well as helps to balance the ecosystem. For instance, irksome flying insects are usually discouraged by the birds attracted to the fountain or birdbath.

Wall fountains are a good choice if your yard is small because they do not need much space in comparison to a spouting or cascading fountain. Either a stand-alone fountain with an even back and an attached basin placed against a fence or a wall, or a wall-mounted kind which is self-contained and hangs on a wall, are some of the possibilities from which you can choose. A water feature can be added to an existing wall if you include some sort of fountain mask as well as a basin to collect the water at the bottom. It is best not to attempt this job yourself as professional plumbers and masons are best suited to do this type of work.

The City Of Rome, Gian Lorenzo Bernini, And Fountains

In Rome’s city center, there are countless celebrated fountains. Gian Lorenzo Bernini, one of the most brilliant sculptors and artists of the 17th century designed, conceptualized and produced almost all of them.

Also a city architect, he had capabilities as a fountain developer, and marks of his life's work are evident throughout the streets of Rome. Bernini's father, a renowned Florentine sculptor, mentored his young son, and they ultimately moved to Rome, in order to fully express their art, primarily in the form of public water fountains and water features. The young Bernini received encouragement from Popes and influential artists alike, and was an diligent worker. His sculpture was originally his claim to popularity. Working gracefully with Roman marble, he used a base of knowledge in the historical Greek architecture, most especially in the Vatican. He was influenced by many great artists, however, Michelangelo had the biggest impact on his work.

Water Transport Strategies in Historic Rome

Aqua Anio Vetus, the first raised aqueduct assembled in Rome, started supplying the individuals living in the hills with water in 273 BC, though they had counted on natural springs up till then. Over this period, there were only two other systems capable of delivering water to higher areas, subterranean wells and cisterns, which accumulated rainwater. From the beginning of the sixteenth century, water was routed to Pincian Hill by way of the underground channel of Acqua Vergine. Spanning the length of the aqueduct’s route were pozzi, or manholes, that gave entry. During the roughly 9 years he possessed the property, from 1543 to 1552, Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi used these manholes to take water from the channel in containers, though they were actually established for the objective of cleaning and servicing the aqueduct. The cistern he had made to gather rainwater wasn’t adequate to meet his water needs. To give himself with a much more streamlined means to gather water, he had one of the manholes opened up, offering him access to the aqueduct below his residence.

Water-raising Tool by Camillo Agrippa

Although the mechanism developed by Agrippa for carrying water gained the esteem of Andrea Bacci in 1588, it seemed to vanish not long after. It could perhaps be that in 1592 when Rome’s latest conduit, the Acqua Felice, began providing the Villa Medici, there was simply no longer much usage for the device. In reality it was perhaps simply abandoned when Ferdinando returned to Florence in 1588 after the demise of his brother, Francesco di Medici, leading Ferdinando to give up his cardinalship in order to secure his position as the next Grand Duke of Tuscany. Renaissance landscapes of the later part of the sixteenth century happened to be home to works including melodious water features, scenographic water demonstrations and water caprices (giochi d’acqua), but these weren’t brimming with water in ways which went against gravity itself.


The First Documented Public Water Features of History
Villages and villages depended on functional water fountains to conduct water for preparing food, washing, and cleaning from nearby sources like ponds, channels, or creeks. To produce water flow through a fountain until... read more